Fields in the TRI Search Forms

Chemical Name and CAS Fields

This set of fields lets you restrict your search by TRI chemical or chemical category. Each chemical or category of chemicals within TRI is identifed by a chemical name and a CAS (Chemical Abstract Services) number. Chemical categories used in TRI do not have CAS numbers, so an ID has been assigned to them by RTK NET: these ID numbers begin with "N". Any CAS number that begins with "N" (or another letter, such as "MIXTURE" or "TRD SECRT") is not an actual CAS number, but works as one on this site.

You can choose a single chemical or chemical category by picking one from either the list sorted by chemical name or the list sorted by CAS number (with CAS numbers shown without dashes and padded to nine numbers with left zeroes). If you choose one from both lists, only the top list will be used in your search.

The chemical name search box allows you to use "*" to represent any number or type of characters, and search on more than one chemical or chemical category at a time. For instance,

would find Many metals have compounds of this type, which you would probably want to find in your search if you are interested in the parent metal. In these cases you should fill in the name of the metal followed by a *. If you fill in both a chemical name and select from one of the lists above, only the chemical that you selected in a list will be used in your search.

City and County Fields

Fill in the name of the county or city that you want - do not fill in the word "county" after counties. Some TRI submissions have their county or city misspelled; others have two varient spellings for the same city or county. For instance, there are submissions that spell their city name either ST. LOUIS or SAINT LOUIS. If you think this may be a factor, you can either run your search twice or use "*" to represent any characters. In the case above you could enter "S*LOUIS" and find both spellings. Watch out for FORT/FT., SAINT/ST., and MOUNT/MT.

Level of Detail Field

This field selects the level of detail you want in your report. A "level of detail" is a predetermined set of data fields. Rather than have you pick out each output field that you may want from a list of hundreds of them, RTK NET lets you choose between the six output formats described below.

Summary
The Summary level of detail supplies output that is intended to give an overview of the search, showing totals of the basic quantities in the database, a breakdown of the search into components, various top lists (e.g. the top 5 cities within the search), and a year trend if the search was on more than one year and the database includes reporting years. It is the default form of output. Because Summary reports only produce one "record" that is a summation of the search, it isn't available through comma or tab-delimited ASCII.
Low
The Low level of detail supplies one line of output for each basic entity, such as a facility, in the search. If you choose HTML output, each line includes a link to more detail on the entity, and the entities can be re-sorted by clicking on the column headers. Therefore, the report functions as a "list of hits".
Medium
In some RTK NET databases, Medium level of detail works like Low, except that it's for a more disaggregated type of entity (for instance, Low detail in TRI lists facilities, while Medium detail lists TRI submissions). In most databases, it works like High detail, showing a page or more of data fields for each entity in the search, although fewer data fields than for High detail.
High
High detail searches present a page or more of data fields for each entity (e.g. facility) retrieved by the search. Sometimes these will be repeating fields for each entity; for instance, multiple chemicals for a single facility. Because it is difficult to present this kind of repeating information within a single comma or tab-delimited file, those forms of output may not produce as many data fields under High detail as HTML or XML output do.
Extended
Extended detail searches present a page or more of data fields for each entity (e.g. facility) retrieved by the search. It includes more data fields than are presented under High detail -- in general, all of the fields that would seem to be generally useful to users. Sometimes these will be repeating fields for each entity; for instance, multiple chemicals for a single facility. Because it is difficult to present this kind of repeating information within a single comma or tab-delimited file, those forms of output may not produce as many data fields under Extended detail as HTML or XML output do. Extended detail is the default output if you click on a single entity from a Low detail output list.
Complete
Complete detail searches present a page or more of data fields for each entity (e.g. facility) retrieved by the search. It includes all of the data fields in the database, whether they seem to be useful or not. (It does exclude data fields that are blank, however.) Sometimes these will be repeating fields for each entity; for instance, multiple chemicals for a single facility. Because it is difficult to present this kind of repeating information within a single comma or tab-delimited file, those forms of output may not produce as many data fields under Complete detail as HTML or XML output do.

Output Type Field

This field selects what output type your report will have:

Text (HTML)
The report will produce human-readable HTML. This is the default output type. RTK NET used to also have plain-text output without HTML markup for use in sending search results via Email, but this is no longer supported.
Comma-delimited ASCII
The report will produce a table of data with the columns separated by commas. Character fields will by surrounded by double quotes so that any commas in them won't be read as column delimiters. This is useful for loading data into a database or spreadsheet. You may be prompted for where you want the comma-delimited file to be downloaded to on your computer, or the download may start automatically, depending on your browser settings.

Tab-delimited ASCII
The report will produce a table of data with the columns separated by tabs. This is just like comma-delimited ASCII above, but it's better than comma-delimited ASCII in cases where you can use it since the program that you load the data into can't be confused by an odd combination of double quotes and commas within a data field.
XML
The program will produce data in the XML data transfer format. You may be prompted for where you want the XML file to be downloaded to on your computer, or the download may start automatically, depending on your browser settings.

Database Type Field

This field selects whether you will use the Frozen or Current versions of the database. The only current difference between these two versions is that the Current version contains chemicals that have been delisted from TRI (i.e. they no longer need to be reported), but still have records in the TRI database, while the Frozen version does not show delisted chemicals in order to match EPA's way of handling them. A description of why these are called Current and Frozen is here.

Chemical category choice

In order to provide some information on possible health effects of chemicals, RTK NET has added chemical health effects from Right to Know Hazardous Substance List prepared by the state of New Jersey Department of Health. A description of what these chemical health effects mean can be found here. The chemical health effects were last updated by RTK NET (i.e. copied from the New Jersey list) in October 2014.

You can search the TRI database for chemicals that can produce one of these effects. For instance, searching for carcinogens will retrieve all TRI submissions that match your other search criteria that are for chemicals that are known carcinogens according to the New Jersey list.

Note that Fact Sheets and chemical health effects for metal compounda and other TRI chemical categories are not generally available. This is because a chemical category includes a large set of different chemicals, some of which may have different health effects -- for instance, hexavalent chromium is known to be a carcinogen, while trivalent chromium is not. However, we have found that TRI reporters often report a metal as a metal compound or vice versa, i.e. lead vs lead compounds. If the chemical category was listed with no health effects while the chemical itself was, this would lead to different notice of different TRI reporters that were essentially doing the same thing. Therefore, we've chosen to list metal chemical categories as having the same health effects (and Fact Sheets) as their metals, even though New Jersey does not.

Some chemical categories are not classified by New Jersey as having health eeffects even though all members of the category generally do. These include Dioxins, PBBs, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Searches for carcingoens will not find these chemical categories because of this reason.

"Core chemical" choice

Selecting "core chemicals" restricts your search to only those chemicals that weren't added to TRI, removed from TRI, or had their method of reporting change drastically within TRI during the year range that you choose. It is intended to let you compare data across a range of years without the comparison being affected by apparent changes that are due to changes in TRI reporting, not by changes in actual pollution or waste generation. Selecting core chemicals only is therefore good for looking at trends by year, but it will eliminate some important chemicals. For instance, mercury had its reporting method change in 2000 due to the PBT rule, so if you select core chemicals only and the range of years in your search extends to both before and after 2000, mercury will be eliminated from your search. Therefore it should be used with caution.

The only effect of selecting core chemicals if you search for data from a single year is that chemicals that were ever delisted from TRI ( that were no longer required to be reported) will not appear in your search, even if there are records for them for that year within the TRI database.

Also note that industries were added to TRI in 1998, and these are not removed by RTK NET's core chemical restriction. Therefore, you may still see an apparent increase in 1998 that is only due to this reporting change.

Further information on year trends and core chemicals is available here.

Type of Offsite Transfer

TRI classifies shipments of waste off-site into two broad categories. First are shipments of water-based waste to POTWs (publically owned treatment works, or sewerage plants). All other transfers offsite -- to recyclers, storage, incinerators, landfills, etc. -- are in a second category. This field lets you choose whether you want transfers to POTWs or all other off-site transfers, or both.

Management Type

Off-site shipments of waste that do not go to POTWS (publicly owned treatment works, or sewerage plants) are coded by the shipper to indicate what kind of recycling, treatment, or disposal is going on at the destination. This is called the "waste management type". You can limit your search by one of these codes in order to, for instance, find only shipments of waste to incinerators.

These codes are unreliable, however. Many of the shippers of the waste appear to have a poor idea of what is going on at the destination; in addition, some of the codes are vague. Use this feature with caution.

Destination Country

Off-site shipments of waste can be sent to countries outside the U.S. If you wish to find shipments going to one of these countries, fill in this field. Be carefull about filling in the Zip code, city, county, or state fields; these are U.S. geographic descriptions that may or may not have a clear meaning for destinations outside the U.S.

Sometimes a TRI reporter will accidentally fill in a U.S. state abbreviation into the country field, which also takes 2-letter abbreviations. This is most often seen with transfers that are actually being sent to California appearing as if they are sent to Canada or vice versa, but this may appear for other apparent countries as well.

Parent Company Dun & Bradstreet Number Field

The Parent company Dun & Bradstreet number is a 9-digit number that is supposed to uniquely identify the company. You may be able to find the D&B number for the company you are interested in by doing a search on one of the company's facilities that you know about, or by outside research. Specifying the D&B number of a company will sometimes produce a more accurate search than searching by company name, although many D&B numbers in the database are misspelled or blank. You will usually want to leave the name field blank if you are searching by D&B, although you can search on both for greater assurance that the facilities you are finding really do belong to the company that you are interested in.

TRI Facility ID Field

TRI facilities are assigned facility IDs by EPA. These IDs are supposed to remain constant for a facility from year to year, even if the facility is sold or changes its name. The TRI IDs are 15 character codes that combine both letters and numbers. If you suspect that you can't find info on a facility because its name has changed, you can try searching by TRI ID. To get its ID in the first place, you will have to find it in one of the years it reports in on this or some other site. Then you can copy down the TRI ID and fill it in on this screen. If you do search by TRI ID, you shouldn't fill in anything for the facility name or city.

Combined Name Field

This field searches on words in the facility name, parent name, mailing address facility name, or current facility or parent name fields. In other words, if you type in "dow" the search would find any facility with the word "Dow" (lower or upper case does not matter) anywhere in any of these data fields. The current facility and parent name fields are the facility name and parent name that a facility has in its most recent TRI submission. In other words, if a facility used to be called "ABC Corp" in the reporting year that you are searching, but is called "XYZ Corp" in the latest TRI reporting year, your search on "xyz" will still find it.

Because of the way the search engine works, there is no way to use an asterisk as a wildcard for this search field -- a wildcard can't be used when it searches more than one data field at a time. Therefore your search can only find complete words: a search on "dow" would not find "dowel". If you want to use a wildcard, you should do a search on either the facility name or the parent name.

If you type in more than one word, the search will look for what you typed in as a complete phrase. This means that you can, for instance, search for "dow chemical" and you would not retrieve facilities with just "dow" or "chemical" in their name. However, it means that you should probably should not add common endings like "inc" or "corp". If you search on "dow inc", the search will not retrieve any facility that submitted its name and parent as being just "dow" or "dow corp".

Facility Name Field

A search using this field can use an asterisk as a wildcard if desired. If the search doesn't use a wildcard, it will search for complete words or phrases within facility names. In that case, a search for "Dow" would find any faciity with a facility name that had the word "Dow" anywhere in it. (Upper or lower case letters make no difference.) A phrase would be searched for as a complete phrase: a search on "dow chemical" would find facilities with this phrase in thier names, but not facilities with either just "dow" or "chemical" in their names. You should probably not add common endings like "dow inc", which would not find facilities named just "Dow","Dow Corp", or "Dow Co". If you use an asterisk as a wildcard, that will represent any number of characters. For instance, a search on "dow*" would find names that started with "dow", whether they were "Dow", "Dow Chemical", or "Dowling Inc." Putting an asterisk at the beginning is possible, but may make your search slow, since an index won't be able to be used. However, it may be necessary in order to e.g. find all variations of Du Pont by using "*du*pont*". (A search on plain "du pont" with no asterisk would find facilities with that phrase in their name, but not facilities that wrote "dupont" as one word. Searching on "du*pont*" without the initial asterisk would not find facilities named "E. I. Du Pont".)

Warning! Facility names are often misspelled when submitted to EPA. In addition, many facilities change their names from year to year. For these reasons, it may be better to get a list of all facilities in the city that your facility of interest is in and find it that way, if your facility name search fails.

Parent Company Field

The parent name, in TRI, is supposed to be the ultimate parent company controlling the facility. Searches using this data field can find all facilities owned by a particular company.

A search using this field can use an asterisk as a wildcard if desired. If the search doesn't use a wildcard, it will search for complete words or phrases within parent names. In that case, a search for "Dow" would find any faciity with a parent name that had the word "Dow" anywhere in it. (Upper or lower case letters make no difference.) A phrase would be searched for as a complete phrase: a search on "dow chemical" would find facilities with this phrase in thier names, but not facilities with either just "dow" or "chemical" in their names. You should probably not add common endings like "dow inc", which would not find facilities with parents named just "Dow","Dow Corp", or "Dow Co". If you use an asterisk as a wildcard, that will represent any number of characters. For instance, a search on "dow*" would find names that started with "dow", whether they were "Dow", "Dow Chemical", or "Dowling Inc." Putting an asterisk at the beginning is possible, but may make your search slow, since an index won't be able to be used. However, it may be necessary in order to e.g. find all variations of Du Pont by using "*du*pont*". (A search on plain "du pont" with no asterisk would find facilities with that phrase in their name, but not facilities that wrote "dupont" as one word. Searching on "du*pont*" without the initial asterisk would not find facilities named "E. I. Du Pont".)

State Field

This lets you search for data within a U.S. state or territory. If you wish to search on the entire US, select the "ALL" value for this field.

Year Field

Each TRI report contains information on all activity for a reporting year -- the same as a calendar year. You can use this set of fields to search for data from a single year or a range of years. To search through all years, select the ALL value from the selection list.

NAICS Industry Field

NAICS codes are 6-digit numbers that represent specific industries. They were adopted starting with the 2006 reporting year for use within TRI instead of SIC; submissions from previous years of TRI reporting (except 1987) were also assigned NAICS codes based on their 2006 reporting, if any, and on their SIC codes.

RTK NET allows you to search on either specific 6-digit NAICS codes or more general industrial categories. These general industrial categories were created by EPA and generally contain the individual NAICS codes listed in the select list below them.

A single TRI submission can have more than one NAICS code. Your search will, by default, use only the first or primary one of these, representing the largest single share of the facility's economic activity. If you are searching by a six-digit NAICS code, you can choose to instead search by all of each facility's NAICS codes. If you search by a general industrial category, the option to search by all NAICS will have no effect, since each TRI submission is assigned only one industrial category based on its primary NAICS code.

Different submissions from the same facility may be in different industries and have different NAICS codes. Therefore, when you search by industry, you may not retrieve all the submissions from each facility.

Sort Order Field

You can choose how you want your output to be sorted. For all reports except the offsite waste transfer report, the choices are:

Default Order
This choice gives you a sort by descending releases (or sometimes by facility name, depending on context) if you choose a text report, or no sort if you choose delimited report output. This was the default behavior before users were allowed to choose sort order.
By facility name
An alphabetic sort by facility name
By releases
Sorts by descending total releases, including on-site, off-site, and Form A midpoint releases.
By releases and transfers
Sorts by descending total releases and transfers
By waste
Sorts by descending total waste, including production-related waste, non-production-related waste, and Form A midpoint waste. Warning: Waste was not reported until the 1991 TRI reporting year, so if you select 1990 or earlier with this sorting method, those data will effectively not be sorted at all.
By state, then facility name
This method sorts the facilities first alphabetically by postal state abbreviation, then alphabetically by facility name within each state.
No sort
Choosing no sort may make your search slightly faster.

For the offsite waste transfer report, the choices are:

Default order
This choice gives you an alphabetic sort by receiving facility name if you choose a text report, or no sort if you choose delimited report output. This was the default behavior before users were allowed to choose sort order.
By shipping facility name
This gives an alphabetic sort by the names of the facilities that sent the waste.
By receiving facility name
This gives an alphabetic sort by the names of the facilities that received the waste.
By transfer amount
This sorts the transfers in descending order of transfer amount, so that the largest transfer is first.
By chemical name
This sorts the transfers by chemical. Within each chemical, the transfers are sorted by descending transfer amount.
No sort
Choosing no sort may give you a slightly faster search.

Zip Code Field

Fill in the zip code for the area that you want. If you fill in a 5-digit zip code, the program will automatically put a "*" after it. The "*" represents any number of characters and will let your search find 9-digit zip codes that start with the 5 digits you entered. Don't fill in dashes.
Example:
If you enter 20740*
this will find

Destination Facility Name

If you fill in this field, the search will find transfers to locations with this facility name, not from locations with this facility name.

Otherwise, help for this field is the same as for facility name.

Destination City or County

If you fill in this field, the search will find transfers to locations with this city or country, not from locations with this city or county.

Otherwise, help for this field is the same as for city or county.

Destination State

If you fill in this field, the search will find transfers to locations with this U.S. state, not from locations with this U.S. state.

Otherwise, help for this field is the same as for state.

Destination Zip Code

If you fill in this field, the search will find transfers to locations with this zip code, not from locations with this zip code.

Otherwise, help for this field is the same as for zip code.

Include RSEI data

If you select yes (the default), then RSEI data will be supplied along with TRI data within your search output. RSEI (Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators) data is a dataset prepared by U.S. EPA that attempts to estimate comparative risk indicator scores for TRI releases and transfers. For more information about RSEI, see RTK NET's brief RSEI help here, or see EPA's RSEI page.

RSEI data are not voluminous, as presented by RTK NET, and should not appreciably change the size of your search output. However, the option of not including them is provided for users who want to e.g. print out TRI data without mixing it with another database that they may or may not wish to present.